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VWN News: Climbing Robot Builds Planes
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 Climbing Robot Builds Planes

This story is from the category Augmenting Organics
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Date posted: 18/04/2005

A climbing robot has been developed that can autonomously work to construct airplanes and ships, according to its creators.

Developed by Spain's Fatronik Technological Centre, the portable climbing robot is designed to carry out precision operations.

Its developers say that the aeronautics industry is a ripe market, as airplane assembly is little automated due partly to the size of airplanes and the means of production.

The new robot is aimed at the assembly stage of the structural elements of airplanes, such as fuselages and wings.

Supporting its weight with suction cups and adapting to the curvature of such structures, the robot can perform precision drilling tasks for riveting and assembly?up to eight holes a minute, says Fatronik.

Besides airplanes, the robotic platform can also be adapted for everything from shipbuilding to cleaning buildings, says Fatronik.

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